As a previous post discussed, employers could have claims asserted against them if an employee believes the person was wrongfully fired or laid off. Moreover, employment litigation could arise when an employee believes the person has been a victim of discrimination, which could also be asserted in a wrongful termination claim. In these matters, an employer needs to take certain steps to protect themselves and the company, providing evidence that such acts did not take place in the work environment.

Based on recent reports, an African American Tanipahoa Parish woman filed a suit against a Chevrolet dealership, her former employer. The woman alleges that she was a victim of discrimination is the workplace and was wrongfully terminated form her position, which would be a violation of Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act.

According to the complaint, the woman was an administrative assistant since 2010 and was supposedly subject to racial and gender discrimination, harassment, retaliation and a hostile work environment. These conditions in the workplace purportedly caused her to develop mental and physical ailments, requiring her to seek medical treatment.

She asserts that due to the intolerable and illegal work conditions, she was resigned her employment at the dealership in April 2016. She also alleges unequal treatment in the workplace, claiming that her white co-workers were treated differently that she was. She seeks to litigate this action in order to recover damages and losses arising from her wrongful termination.

While an employee might seek to litigate an employment law issue, it is possible for employers to negotiate a deal instead of going to court. Employer liability could harm a business, especially is cases of discrimination and wrongful termination. Thus, employers facing such allegation should take certain steps to understand their rights and options. This will not only protect their interests but also prevent these legal issues from disrupting the normal course of business.

Source: Louisianarecord.com, “Administrative assistant accuses Chevrolet dealer of discrimination,” Michael Abella, August 31, 2016